Was the Liar solved?

I vaguely recall that somewhere Karl Popper expresses his suspicion that some philosophers are unwilling to accept a solution to a challenging problem because they have become so fond of the problem. I wonder if this applies to the Liar Paradox and a “simple solution” that Eugene Mills supports. As Mills sees it (and I’m effectively convinced) the Liar is not paradoxical, but plain false, and though it appears to truthfully say it is false, it does not truthfully say so. So it’s just false. Continue reading “Was the Liar solved?”

Dogma vs Certainty

High certainty does not entail inflexibility, narrow-mindedness, nor dogmatism.

For instance, I have high certainty that the Earth is not flat. This certainty is evidenced by the fact that if I were given the opportunity to bet accordingly under sufficiently reliable conditions, I would do so. I might even give the Flat-Earther better odds. Continue reading “Dogma vs Certainty”

Thinking about Rights to Freedoms

A right is a normative rule establishing that society owes or allows something to certain parties. Some rights guarantee freedoms. Rights to freedoms are the focus here. When thinking about freedom it is useful to keep in mind that freedom is not a simple property that an individual may or may not have, nor is it a simple state of affairs that may or may not hold in a society. Freedom is instead a complex relation with variables that need specification. Continue reading “Thinking about Rights to Freedoms”